Tag Archives: toxic plants

Spring Hazards for Pets

It’s hard to believe, but spring is just around the corner. As the weather starts to warm up, both people and pets will happily head outdoors to enjoy some fresh air and sunshine. This is also the time of year when many of us will roll up our sleeves and get some spring cleaning done. Remember to keep your pet’s health and safety in mind! Read on as a Fort Collins, CO vet lists some seasonal hazards for pets.

Parasites

As soon as the weather warms up, parasites will start coming out in full force. Make sure your furry pal is up to date on parasite control products. It’s also important to stay current on your pet’s vaccinations. Many wild animals will be out and about in spring. You definitely don’t want to take a chance of your four-legged buddy getting infected with rabies—or anything else—after a chance encounter!

Lawn/Garden Products

Once the snow melts, many people start applying fertilizers, pesticides, and herbicides to their lawns. These products can be very toxic to pets! Make sure to store lawn/garden chemicals in a secure spot that your furry companion can’t reach. If you treat your yard, keep your animal companion out of that area for at least a few days. Giving the lawn a good soaking will also help get residue off your grass. Pets can get sick just by walking through an area that was just sprayed, and then licking their paws!

Toxic Plants

Many popular plants are poisonous to pets. We strongly recommend choosing only plants that are safe for pets. You can check the ASPCA site for a full directory of both toxic and non-toxic plants.

Easter Trappings

Are you planning a family gathering for Easter? Chocolates, flowers, and plastic eggs are all hazardous to pets, so keep these away from your animal buddy. Also, make sure to immediately remove leftovers and uneaten food, and dispose of waste in a secure container. Bones, fruit pits, toothpicks, skewers, and tin foil are all very dangerous to our furry friends.

Household Chemicals

You may want to give your house a good cleaning once the weather warms up. Just be sure not to expose your four-legged buddy to dangerous chemicals. Many common cleaning products are toxic to pets!

Is your pet due for veterinary care? Contact us, your Fort Collins, CO animal clinic, today!

Planting a Pet-Friendly Garden

Warmer weather is on the way! With winter in the rear-view mirror, many of us are heading outside to tend to our lawns and gardens, and soak up some sunshine. Our furry friends will also be happy to run and play outside again after spending so much time indoors. Pets and gardens are both wonderful things, but they don’t always mix well. Therefore, you may need to take some precautions to keep both your furbaby and your garden safe. Below, a Fort Collins, CO vet offers advice on planting pet-friendly gardens.

Keeping Fido Out Of Beds

There are a few things you can do to keep your canine buddy from trampling your flower and vegetable beds. One option is to section off your garden by creating a barrier around it. You can use chicken wire, a low fence, or a stone, brick, or log wall. Or, distract Fido by giving him his own sandbox to play and bury toys in. Your four-legged pirate may have so much fun in his doggy play zone that he ignores the garden.

Keeping Your Kitty Out Of The Garden

The best way to keep Fluffy out of your garden is to keep her inside. While your kitty may love rolling around in your yard, she’ll be both safer and healthier living indoors, where she isn’t exposed to cars, predators, and other hazards. That said, if your furball does have outdoor access, try spritzing your plants with cayenne pepper to keep her out of your plant beds.

Choosing Pet-Safe Plants

Many of our favorite plants, such as daisies, lilies, daffodils, holly, and several ferns, are extremely toxic to our furry friends. Be sure to choose only plants that are safe for your beloved pet. You can find a complete list of toxic and non-toxic plants on the ASPCA website.

Cover

Did you know that cocoa mulch is toxic to pets? Mulch is also dangerous because it poses a choking risk to dogs. Additionally, it can harbor fleas, ticks, and even snakes. And, as if that weren’t enough, your pet could also get painful splinters in their paws by walking on it. Use something else instead. Pea gravel, flat stones, or tiles are good options for paths.

Do you have any concerns about your pet’s health or care? We can help! Contact us, your Fort Collins, CO animal clinic, anytime.