Tag Archives: pocket pet cage

Your Pocket Pet Deserves the Best Accommodations

Your brand-new pocket pet will enjoy the plushest lodgings in town. You haven’t decided whether you’ll bring home a gerbil, hamster, or pet rat. However, all of these little guys would be pleased with your choice of multilevel habitats. You’ve also decided to add species-appropriate climbing equipment. Of course, if you had chosen a guinea pig, they prefer to hang out on the ground floor. Since you’re not an expert on pocket pets, you’ll ask your veterinary clinic Fort Collins for professional advice. Read more about pocket pet accommodations.

Well-Designed Enclosure

Look for a glass or heavy plastic enclosure, as you can easily clean and disinfect both surfaces. Add a screened top or front for more ventilation, so your little pet doesn’t contract respiratory problems from his urine’s high ammonia content.

Tightly secure your pet’s enclosure against his escape attempts. After all, small rodents can climb their cage sides, and can fit through impossibly small spaces, if they think freedom’s on the other side.

Appealing Cage Furnishings

Every self-respecting pocket pet wants a collection of exercise tubes and tunnels. While pet stores and online retailers sell these furnishings, your little rodent will be happy with wrapping paper and paper towel rolls. Allow your pet to shred the cardboard; however, don’t let him eat it.

Sometimes your pocket pet just wants some peace and quiet. Find him a hide box where he can conceal himself from the outside world. While you can buy pre-made hide boxes, a handcrafted box will be less expensive.

Properly Sized Exercise Wheel

While your pocket pet will love his exercise wheel, make sure you purchase one that matches his body size. If the wheel is too big, his little feet and legs can become trapped. If the wheel is too small, he’ll find it tough to get a decent workout.

Comfy, Hygienic Bedding

Place plenty of paper-based bedding on your little pet’s cage floor; and he’ll shape the paper shreds into a nice warm nest. Pine, aspen, and oak shavings can also work; however, avoid cedar shavings that can cause respiratory problems. Change bedding often to prevent ammonia buildup and mold growth. Store extra bedding in heavy sealed containers in your house.

Give your rodent pet a good start by scheduling a new patient exam with your veterinary clinic Fort Collins. For information about pocket pet habitats, or other care needs, schedule a vet appointment today.